The Black Voices Project
A virtual book club uplifting black voices
welcome!
The purpose of this digital space

The Black Voices Project is a virtual Black book club and community dedicated to uplifting Black literary/creative voices through a range of mediums including books, essays, podcasts, and more! Our hope is to facilitate meaningful conversations about systemic racism and Black history while addressing current political, racial, and social issues impacting Black culture.

We will read together, learn together and grow together!

Book Selection: On the 1st of every month, ULMS will pick a text to read for the next 30 days. The text will differ each month ranging from non-fiction to fiction and even poetry. Each book selected will all focus on race, anti-racism, and/or Black culture.

Discussion Questions: We know everyone reads at their own pace. Feel free to break out into smaller groups with your friends if that makes you more comfortable! Discussion questions will be posted each month on this page and in our private Facebook group (details below) for those who would like to start a small reading circle in their workspaces or to think through personally. 

Monthly Zoom Group: During the first week of each month, there will be a live zoom discussion to cultivate conversations on the entirety of the text from the previous month’s book pick. Zoom details will be shared in the tab below!

Join the Book Club! Ready to participate in the dopest virtual Black book club ever? Head to the join section and get into the loop! 

Here you’ll find books we have scheduled to read in the coming months. Please note, this list is subject to change:

2021

  • May: Hood Feminism by Mikki  Kendall
  • June: The Prophets by Robert Jones Jr. 

2020

  • August: “So You Want to Talk About Race” by Ijeoma Oluo
  • September: “Citizen” by Claudia Rankine 
  • October: “One Person, No Vote” by Carol Anderson
  • November: “Kindred” by Octavia Butler
  • December: No Book Selection
  • January:  “Me & White Supremacy” by Layla Saad
  • February: “Their Eyes Were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston
  • March: “How to be an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi
  • April: “The Hate U Give” by  Angie Thomas

Although Black lives have always mattered (and Black people have been dying at the hands of systemic racism long before this year), something about this moment feels different. According to the New York Times, between 15 million and 26 million people in the U.S. participated in demonstrations in the weeks following George Floyd’s murder… making this the largest movement in our country’s history.

"This is a movement; not a moment."

Join the Club!
Step one
Subscribe to our book club mailing list.

We’re excited to read with you! Once you officially subscribe to the Black Voices Project, you will get instant access to: 

  • Monthly book wrap up Zoom meeting invitation
  • Adv. notice to claim free books
  • Mini monthly newsletter 
  • Access to our private Black Voices Project Facbook group
  • Free discounts and perks for Seattle Arts & Lectures events and tickets!
Step two
Start reading!

Once you’re subscribed, we’ll reach out to you with this month’s book pick and some think questions to get you started. If you don’t have our selected book, see below for ways to read along!

Step three
Tune in to discuss!

Join us at the end of each month for our wrap-up zoom discussion! We’ll have an in depth discussion and round-table analysis of the book, it’s themes, and real world application. You can also check in with our Facebook group for real time engagement, some surprise giveaways, announcements and more!

In order to truly understand this moment and our role in it, we must know how history brought us here and make a serious commitment to amplify Black voices.

We are in the middle of a collective commitment right now, to #DoBetter, dismantle white supremacy, and fight for equity for all. It’s as if, as a nation, we have hit a boiling point and are suddenly wondering: How did we get here, and what can we do about it now?

BOOK OF THE MONTH
Here's what we're reading:

Today’s feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?

 

In her searing collection of essays, Mikki Kendall takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement, arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women. Drawing on her own experiences with hunger, violence, and hypersexualization, along with incisive commentary on politics, pop culture, the stigma of mental health, and more, Hood Feminism delivers an irrefutable indictment of a movement in flux. An unforgettable debut, Kendall has written a ferocious clarion call to all would-be feminists to live out the true mandate of the movement in thought and indeed. (Third Place Books)

Mikki Kendall is a writer, diversity consultant, and occasional feminist; she has appeared on the BBC, NPR, The Daily Show, PBS, Good Morning America, MSNBC, Al Jazeera, WBEZ, and Showtime, and discusses race, feminism, police violence, tech, and pop culture at institutions and universities across the country. She is the author of the New York Times-bestselling HOOD FEMINISM (recipient of the Chicago Review of Books Award and named a best book of the year by BBC, Bustle, and TIME). She is also the author of AMAZONS, ABOLITIONISTS, AND ACTIVISTS, a graphic novel illustrated by A. D’Amico. Her essays can be found at TIME, the New York TimesThe Guardian, the Washington PostEssenceVogueThe Boston GlobeNBC, and a host of other sites.

“One of the biggest issues with mainstream feminist writing has been the way the idea of what constitutes a feminist issue is framed. We rarely talk about basic needs as a feminist issue. Food insecurity and access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met.”

“Sometimes being a good ally is about opening the door for someone instead of insisting that your voice is the only one that matters.”

“There’s nothing feminist about having so many resources at your fingertips and choosing to be ignorant. Nothing empowering or enlightening in deciding that intent trumps impact. Especially when the consequences aren’t going to be experienced by you, but will instead be experienced by someone from a marginalized community.”

“Poverty is an apocalypse in slow motion, inexorable and generational.”

 

book access
How to Read Along With Us

Don’t have a copy of our selected book? No worries! Each book is accessible digitally via the Seattle Public Library (SPL). All you need is a free library card. To get one, simply click the button below and we’ll help you get started! If you don’t have a Seattle based address, you can always get a free eCard and access the book via the King County Library System (KCLS). If all else fails, you can also check out the library’s audiobook option (also free)!

Our goal is to make these books, podcasts, poems  and conversations accessible for anyone who is willing to show up for the Black community. We know that anti-racism work doesn’t stop when the protests end. Anti-racism work is a practice! It requires intention and commitment.

“Revolution is not a one-time event.” - Audre Lorde

Build your library
Get a free copy of this month's book!

Owning a personal collection of books is a special opportunity each of us should have. We want to help you get started!

If you love that “new book” smell or simply enjoy the traditional flip of a real page, this one is for you! Each month, we will send the physical version of our selected book of the month to the first 10 readers who claim a copy via the button below! If you miss your chance to claim a book, don’t worry! You can always come back next month and try again.

RESTRICTIONS: First come, first served. One book per household. 

Since the brutal murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Shaun Fuhr, Manuel Ellis, and others– race has been top of mind in our nation’s consciousness. Those around the nation are reaffirming that, “Yes, Black Lives do Matter”! It is clear that people want to do better. Now, communities are looking for ways to learn how to show up even further for the Black community in this time and all time.

"We have learned to fly the air like birds and swim the sea like fish, but we have not learned the simple art of living together as brothers" - MLK Jr.

exclusive access

As an official member of the Black Voices Project, you will have access to exclusive discount opportunities, tickets, events, and more provided by our friends from Seattle Arts & Lectures (SAL)! 

Free Youth Starter Library
Middle school aged students
Access to books is just as important for our youth as it is for adults.

While the Black Voices Project is centered around a digital book club experience for adults, we also recognize that many children don’t have access to leisure books or books with stories and characters they can relate to. For a limited time, you can now request a FREE Youth Starter Library!

Each Youth Starter Library will contain 3 books written by authors of color from the middle grade fiction genre (ages 8-12). The books will be pre-selected randomly from our existing catalog of 30+ titles including:

  • Hidden Figures (Young Readers Edition)
  • The Watsons Go To Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis
  • Dragons in a Bag by Zetta Elliott
  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
  • Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore
  • +More!
How to REQUEST YOUR LIBRARY

Interested in claiming a Youth Starter Library for your child? Simply click the button below to get started!

RESTRICTIONS: First come, first served. One library per household.